Michelle Lensink

Drugs Summit

A question put forward to the Hon. G.E. GAGO (Minister for Environment and Conservation, Minister for Mental Health and Substance Abuse, Minister Assisting the Minister for Health) regarding Drugs Summit.

The Hon. J.M.A. LENSINK (20 September 2006).

1. Which non-government organisations are being funded as a result of the 2002 Drugs Summit recommendations?

2. (a) How much has been granted to each organisation on a recurrent or one-off basis; and

(b) For what services?

The Hon. G.E. GAGO (Minister for Environment and Conservation, Minister for Mental Health and Substance Abuse, Minister Assisting the Minister for Health): I am advised that:

1. The majority of funding that resulted from the 2002 Drugs Summit was provided to lead agencies in Government. More recently, one-off funding of $206,000 has been provided until June 2008 through the Drugs Summit Initiative to establish the South Australian Network for Drug and Alcohol Services (SANDAS). SANDAS is the peak body for NGOs representing the interests of the South Australian alcohol and other drugs sector.

2. Drugs Summit funding indirectly increased the capacity of the non-government sector to respond to drug misuse issues. For example:

a number of Drugs Summit funded initiatives were joint projects that involved non-government agencies as key stakeholders in the conduct and consultation phase of these projects.

several projects increased the capacity of NGOs to engage the target group by providing training and printed resources (eg, the dance party scene and heroin overdose projects).

additional funding was provided to strengthen existing programs, such as the Drug Court to provide treatment and support services. Some of these support services are delivered by NGOs.

funding of $450,000 was provided to the Department of Education and Children's Services for three financial years for school drug strategy work. This funding was shared proportionately across government and non-government schools based on per capita enrolments.

a major outcome of the Aboriginal Drug Action Team trial was the building of stronger networks between SAPOL and Aboriginal communities and agencies within local service areas.

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